A little tip in September

The strongest businesses have clear processes and proceedures. They make sure they have a risk register to identify and help mitigate against the risks their business might face in the future. Whilst it is almost certain no business had global pandemic on their risk register pre-March 2020, well run businesses certainly have it on their risk register now. 

The best way to survive the unexpected is to identify and control what you can predict so your business is in a stronger position when the unexpected happens.

Challenge Anneka

Do you remember Challenge Anneka? It was a staple of Saturday evenings in the Bevan houshold. The premise, if you don’t know, was that Anneka Rice had to complete a challenging task – often to aid a charitable cause such as building a play area – over a limited time period.

Whilst this is not something we are likely to do personally, setting ourselves challenges is a great way of feeling a sense of achievement. They motivate us to higher things and test what we are capable of.

In May we walked the West Mendip Way in a day (well – 12 hours). It is 30 miles, 4000ft of climb and the last 5 miles were just a hard slog! But we did it.

Although this was not a business test, I think that any challenges we set ourselves make us stronger in all aspects of our lives.

In a challenging year for the wrong reasons how about setting yourself some challenges for the right ones?

A little tip for February

When your business is facing challenges, and there are many factors influencing it that are not under your control, having a clear plan for your business will help you to keep focussed on your goals and take control of the factors you can influence.

Businesses that struggle often have no clear direction or strategy, and so their growth, stagnation or decline is determined not by the owners but by the winds of fortune.

Let’s all plan for success in 2021 and put the challenges of 2020 behind us.

Also, make sure you are up-to-date on any Government help you can take advantage of to help your organisation survive. Many local councils have extra help available and there are grant organisations who want to help in specific areas.

Some well directed Google searching could pay dividends. But be careful not to overextend your commitments to repay later

All hands on deck – again!

This month I am definitely been lacking in inspiration. It may be because work has been busy, but also because the holiday I have recently taken was to do DIY jobs around the house.

So, I hope you won’t mind that I am revisiting the theme of an article I wrote in 2017, because it is pertinent to the holiday jobs I we have just undertaken. The biggest of which was replacing half of the roof of the cabin that houses the HQ of Bevan Financial Management!

Planning is important so we started off by  asking ourselves some key questions:

  1. What is our budget?
  2. How will we get the materials to do the job as availability of wood etc., has been effected by COVID 19?
  3. What time will we need for the project as we needed to ensure we would not be caught out by rain when the roof was off!
  4. Will we do the job ourselves or get someone in to do it for us?

As you will know from previous articles I am a great believer in getting a professional to do a professional job. However,my husband Jeff is pretty handy at woodwork – and we had built the cabin ourselves originally – so we decided we would do the work ourselves. This decision handily reduced the budget needed – but would hopefully not come back to bite us! 

Our son Alex and I would be Jeff’s labourers! Happily we are both very good at taking instruction from other people – NOT! 

Last week was D day!

We had to make sure we had all the tools and materials we needed before the we started as the time we had available to complete the job was limited. Google came in very handy for finding the supplier of felting and shingles. Luckily, we were able to use a local supplier for the wood who delivered everything in good time and for free! 

The day we chose for the job was sunny and hot with no sign of rain. This helped immensely but it was THE LONGEST DAY OF OUR LIVES!! But it was relatively stress free because we knew exactly what we were doing and were focused on the time we had to do it.

The job came out well and I am tucked up tight for another 8 years (hopefully).

The lesson from all of this? If you have a project, whether business or personal, plan for success and you are much more likely to get the results you need.

Are you planning to do better?

So, are you planning to do better in 2020 than in 2019? Most of us are – and January is the time when we resolve that it will happen. But do you know what better is? And what does ‘better’ mean anyway?

Many business owners, especially if they are a sole trader, struggle to even know whether they are doing well or not.

The reasons for this are as follows:

Firstly, many business owners do not have a plan for their business. This means that, even if they have up to date profitability figures in front of them, they don’t know if the figures are good or bad. It is only by having a robust plan, covering several years and based on your own goals, that you can judge whether your business will meet your goals, or not. A business which does not meet the owners’ goals is not doing well – however much profit it might be making.

Secondly, many business owners do not have up-to-date financial information. This means that even if they know their goals, they have no idea if they are meeting them. Some business owners keep a pretty close eye on sales/turnover but leave the rest to sort itself out. However, sales are just part of the picture. If you don’t control your costs or your cashflow, your business will struggle.

Thirdly, it is vital to know who’s definition of ‘doing well’ is important. For me, the only measure which is meaningful is YOURS. I see business owners struggling to match someone else’s ideal, rather than their own.

Finally, if you don’t know whether or not you are doing well, the chances are you will via to one extreme or the other. You will either believe you are doing far better than you are, or you will believe you are doing far worse. The first delusion will probably mean you come across quite unexpected problems with cash flow. The second will leave you feeling disillusioned and demotivated.

So, do yourself a favour and make sure you have a robust business plan, which you are updating with current financial figures. That way you will know for sure if you are doing well – and you will know if this year is ‘better’, following your definition of the word, than last year.

Fiona 🙂

Will 2020 be YOUR year?

It’s that time of year when we come up with fantastic ideas and resolutions for the year ahead. Unfortunately, these ideas and resolutions, which seemed so fantastic in 2019, will have been forgotten very early on in 2020 The reason for this is that we tend to come up with woolly, general thoughts rather than a real plan for change.

How about making this year different? If you really want to change your business, your work/life balance, your effectiveness or any other aspect of your life, you have to think through what you want to achieve.

What are your timescales? What are your specific goals? How will you measure change? What resources will you need? Who do you need to help you?

Once you have thought through all the aspects of your idea write them down so you have a point of reference – and then DO IT!

By taking the time to plan you will find it much more likely that you will keep your resolutions and move forward.

Don’t wish upon a star – reach for it!

Fiona

Plan for the worst…

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Flooding has become an real risk in many areas across the country, as has coastal erosion, and other natural disaster events, which seem to be more prevalent than in previous decades. As the consequences of global warning are starting to increasingly impact on people’s lives it is important to consider how your business might be affected by future events.

It is a sad fact that at least half of of businesses devastated by flooding (or other natural disasters) will never recover, and those that do, may take a long time to get back on track.

Before they can repair and rebuild there is often the initial wrangling with the insurance company about how much they should pay out, but there are far wider implications to a business than just putting right the premises.

The problem is not just the event itself but the downtime the business experiences whilst the damage is repaired, and the consequences of that downtime.

Do you continue to pay your staff even when they are not able to work and if you do so, how do you afford a wages bill when you have no income coming in? Once even loyal customers have gone elsewhere, how do you persuade them back when you are up and running again?

These are the type of issues many businesses do not consider until forced to do so.

Natural disaster events are just one type of business catastrophe but there are many others all businesses should consider and plan for. The scale of the catastrophe will be linked to the importance of the occurrence to the business.

For example, if your business server fails how big an impact would that have on your business? If all your staff need to access information on that server 24/7 it could cost you dearly and clearly in that situation it is vital that you have a backup plan to cover just that type of emergency.

Alternatively, if you are heavily reliant on one employee what would you do if that employee goes off sick for an extended period of time?

Every business has its own ‘flood’ scenario and it is hugely important that you have a disaster recovery plan to mitigate against the worst effects of a catastrophic event. You need to build your ‘flood’ defenses – first identify the scenarios which could do the worst damage, plan for how you would deal with those scenarios in the most effective way, and ensure you have the ‘backups’ in place.

Of course we hope never to use our backup plans, but at least if we have one in place, we are as prepared as we can be if the worst happens.

Fiona 🙂

Happy Christmas?


Christmas can be a very hectic time of year and can be particularly challenging for business women with families.

Now, I am sure there are families where the menfolk take on their fair share of the Christmas chores, but I would venture to say that they are the exception rather the rule. Most of the writing of cards, buying and wrapping of presents, the catering and family organising tends to fall on the shoulders of the girls – it’s our traditional role which doesn’t seem to have changed with our entry into the workplace.

This means that Christmas often becomes a juggling act between business and family obligations – often meaning stress rather than fun is the result.

Until a couple of years ago I found it difficult to get the balance right, and two years in a row was actually ill over the Christmas period as a result. It is one of those inexplicable phenomina that as soon as you relax after a period of hectic activity that your body sees it as an opportunity to be ill!

So I decided I had to pace myself to survive and enjoy Christmas again.

Firstly, I try to buy Christmas presents throughout the year – this not only helps with the pacing thing but also helps to spread the cost.

Secondly, I cut myself a little slack and don’t put pressure on myself to provide a ‘perfect’ Christmas. Just because Nigella and Delia have the time and skills to produce endless quantities of delicious Christmas fare, does not mean that we mere mortals have to emulate them. I don’t see the point in spending hours in the kitchen preparing food which my family will demolish in 5 minutes!

Finally, I close the office on the same day the boys are home from university. This means I can spend some quality time with the family. I give my clients plenty of notice so we can cover any issues in good time and, in any case, most of them are winding down too.

So, in parting, I would just like to say this, give yourself a break and enjoy the festive season.

MERRY CHRISTMAS – and a happy 2019 too.

Fiona 🙂

Remember the days

If, like me, your school and college days are a dim and distant memory, it is easy to forget the stress that accompanies the waiting for exam results.

For many A’ level students good results can open the door to their university of choice; whilst bad results can appear to firmly thwart hopes of a good career.

Fortunately, we know that exam results are not the be all and end all – even if it feels like it at the time. Often opportunities come to light that mean success can be acheived even if you haven’t 3 A * and a place at a Russell Group University.

I certainly found that my disappointing A levels led me down a road that I would not have previously considered, but was, in fact perfect for me. Instead of studying law at Nottingham I did European Business Studies with a year in Germany – and had the BEST fun!

At the tender age of 18 a world of possibilitles is open to us. We don’t have any responsibilities and so can be very flexible in deciding the route we want to take.
Even at 21 or 22, if we have been to university, we have no path set in stone and can consider many different possibilities for our future employment.

As life goes on it seems our paths become more and more set in concrete. Financial and family commitments seem to stifle our urges to try something new or change course. Even if we are dissatisfied with our working lives we persist with the career we chose years ago because we cannot see a way out.

Even as business owners who have broken away from lives as wage slaves, we often stick to the original business model we drew up when we started out because it is the easiest path – not because we are particularly fulfilled by our work.

I think it is important that we take time to stock on a regular basis. We should ask ourselves if we are making the best use of our skills and limited time – or if there is something more fulfilling we could be doing.

It is great to give ourselves the space to see the world as our 18 year old selves would – as brimming with opportunities and possibiities.

Fiona 🙂

New Year’s Resolution time


It’s that time of year when we come up with fantastic ideas and resolutions for the year ahead. Unfortunately, these ideas and resolutions, which seemed so fantastic in 2017, will have been forgotten very early on in 20108 The reason for this is that we tend to come up with woolly, general thoughts rather than a real plan for change.

How about making this year different? If you really want to change your business, your work/life balance, your effectiveness or any other aspect of your life, you have to think through what you want to achieve. What are your timescales? What are your specific goals? How will you measure change? What resources will you need? Who do you need to help you?

Once you have thought through all the aspects of your idea write them down so you have a point of reference – and then DO IT!

By taking the time to plan you will find it much more likely that you will keep your resolutions and move forward.

Don’t wish upon a star – reach for it!